Academic journals online dating

We use cookies to offer you a better experience, personalize content, tailor advertising, provide social media features, and better understand the use of our services.To learn more or modify/prevent the use of cookies, see our Cookie Policy and Privacy Policy.Once stigmatized as rife with deception and desperation, online dating services such as have become popular venues for adults to meet potential romantic partners.Data from the PEW Internet and Daily Live project reveals that 11% of online adults, and 74% of single adults seeking romantic relationships have used an online dating service (Madden & Lenhart, 2006).

The process of transitioning from online communication to offline interaction has been examined under the label of modality switching (MS) (Ramirez & Zhang, 2007; Ramirez & Wang, 2008).Although you might want to enlist a friend to help with your profile—the data from the Pew Research Center indicates that 22 percent of online daters have asked a friend for help crafting the perfect profile.We use cookies to make interactions with our website easy and meaningful, to better understand the use of our services, and to tailor advertising.Most research has conceptualized online dating using the frameworks of self-presentation (Ellison, Heino, & Gibbs, 2006; Ellison, Hancock, & Toma, 2011; Whitty, 2008), or self-disclosure/uncertainty reduction (Gibbs, Ellison, & Lai, 2011).This literature provides excellent understanding of the various factors related to impression management and deception/honesty in online dating, yet it is limited to the scope of profile construction and interpretation.

Leave a Reply